2007 3.0r-b JDM DCCD Swap

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Re: 2007 3.0r-b JDM DCCD Swap

Postby RX25SE » Wed Feb 24, 2021 11:25 am

JezzaH6 wrote:
RX25SE wrote: Thanks for the info!
What's it like through the gears around town?


Not a problem!


Well, you just convinced me to go DCCD when my current box gives issues.

Thanks!
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Re: 2007 3.0r-b JDM DCCD Swap

Postby nvmylh » Mon Mar 01, 2021 3:35 pm

Hey Jezza I noticed on sautrday that you had some braided hoses running under your front crash bar, any info on what those were for?
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Re: 2007 3.0r-b JDM DCCD Swap

Postby Turbo Lag » Mon Mar 01, 2021 5:30 pm

nvmylh wrote:Hey Jezza I noticed on sautrday that you had some braided hoses running under your front crash bar, any info on what those were for?


99% sure lines for the oil cooler he's set up. :good:
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Re: 2007 3.0r-b JDM DCCD Swap

Postby JezzaH6 » Thu Mar 04, 2021 1:13 pm

nvmylh wrote:Hey Jezza I noticed on sautrday that you had some braided hoses running under your front crash bar, any info on what those were for?


TurboLag is correct! Have seen oil hit 130+ on track and that makes me uncomfortable. Aftermarket sumps for an EZ aren't really a thing, and the stock oil capacity is a lot anyway. The cooler itself is mounted in front of the passenger front wheel behind the fog-light surround, and the surround itself has been modified to allow for airflow. The oil comes from a thermostatic sandwich plate, and now sits at 80ish on highway, and I have seen it go as high as 109c on a particularly steep mountain run. On the same mountain in the past it would be easily 115-118, so given its only a small cooler I'm pretty happy with the results!

Trying to find time to do a write up for it but BigBadBenny wants the electronics side of this gearbox swap first :lol: :lol:
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Re: 2007 3.0r-b JDM DCCD Swap

Postby bigBADbenny » Sun Mar 21, 2021 6:10 pm

You are just kicking this outta the park!

I’d be doing same in your shoes, lol.
No wait, you can help me with mine! :P
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Re: 2007 3.0r-b JDM DCCD Swap

Postby nvmylh » Mon Mar 22, 2021 9:02 am

Ah ok, from the photos I thought you had a standard style mishimoto sandwich plate, no thermostatic business going on? 130 is pretty hot!
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Re: 2007 3.0r-b JDM DCCD Swap

Postby JezzaH6 » Tue Apr 06, 2021 9:43 pm

Trying to find the time to do a write-up for the oil cooler as I think it's not a terrible thing to have fitted to these cars. Oil temps are definitely something worth watching especially for these engines that are really picky on oil quality. Oil temperatures would be a bare minimum to watch, but low oil pressure is ultimately what kills them so watching that isn't a bad idea too.

I was running a standard mishimoto sandwich plate just to run the sensors, but after watching oil temperatures for about 12 months through many different situations I decided it was worth adding a cooler to the system too. Now I'm running a different mishimoto sandwich plate with thermostatically-controlled oil cooler ports, running to a 10 row plate-and-fin style cooler.

Pre-cooler install I had seen oil temps anywhere from 65-68c cruising on the freeway (which is way too cold and happened when I was running a GT thermostat), up to 135c+ on track which is way too hot. Now with an upgraded radiator, the stock 82c coolant thermostat and a 72c thermostat in the sandwich plate the oil sits around 85-90c on the highway, and on the last track day the oil stayed locked in around 125c, which is a win in my book! Next oil change I an going to swap the sandwich plate thermostat to a higher temperature one to try and bring the oil temps up a bit on the highway.
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Re: 2007 3.0r-b JDM DCCD Swap

Postby Yowie » Wed Apr 07, 2021 4:40 pm

Next oil change I an going to swap the sandwich plate thermostat to a higher temperature one to try and bring the oil temps up a bit on the highway.


Alternatively, if the oil cooler is practically reachable you could attach/detach a full or partial airflow block-off plate depending on whether you are going for a freeway cruise or going to a track day.

Probably not a better solution than a goldilocks oil thermostat, but it's another club in your bag.
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Re: 2007 3.0r-b JDM DCCD Swap

Postby JezzaH6 » Wed Apr 07, 2021 8:47 pm

Yowie wrote:
Next oil change I an going to swap the sandwich plate thermostat to a higher temperature one to try and bring the oil temps up a bit on the highway.


Alternatively, if the oil cooler is practically reachable you could attach/detach a full or partial airflow block-off plate depending on whether you are going for a freeway cruise or going to a track day.

Probably not a better solution than a goldilocks oil thermostat, but it's another club in your bag.


That's also something I'm working on. The cooler is behind the passenger fog light surround so is somewhat accessible. AS my oil temp and pressure gauges are DIY ones running on a way-overkill microcontroller I am working on an actively-controlled cover for the cooler itself, which will block and unblock airflow when necessary. Main problem at the moment is having it not melt when really pushing it :roll:
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Re: 2007 3.0r-b JDM DCCD Swap

Postby JezzaH6 » Wed Apr 07, 2021 9:14 pm

Well I’ve had the electronics and interior control aspects of my DCCD swap in the car and working for the last 6 or so weeks, and finally have the time to write up my experiences with it!

I was really worried about this aspect of the DCCD swap, as my car is a 07 3.0R-B, which is a CAN-BUS equipped vehicle. This, theoretically anyway, makes accessing sensors, especially the vehicle wheel speed sensors, a lot more difficult.

I chose to use a SpiiderPlus DCCD controller, made by DCCDPro in the US. While this is not a cheap option there were a few good reasons why I chose this. Firstly, it appears to be at least somewhat of a community developed and tuned controller, and they are active on forums especially in the States. After receiving my unit and tearing it down (because of course I would) I definitely got the impression of a more ‘hobbyist’ type product, which I can totally get behind.

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DCCD controller, GRB SI drive and DCCD Switch Panel

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Torn-down SpiiderPlus DCCD Controller

Secondly, the SpiiderPlus itself has a neat party trick- it uses a co-processor. This allows it to set DCCD output levels based on the inputs from an accelerometer, gyroscope, throttle position sensor and, most importantly, wheel speed sensors. It doesn’t use a map of outputs for different surfaces, rather it has access to enough real-time data to algorithmically determine the optimum DCCD setting, up to a simple-to-input user selectable threshold.

By having access to the wheel speed sensor data this controller, thanks to its additional processing power compared to other controllers on the market, can determine wheel slip. This allows it to dynamically adjust the DCCD output mid-corner the moment it starts to see understeer, but not have the centre diff locked as you’re entering a corner. This should help maintain good steering feel and feedback at the moment of turn in by allowing slip through the centre diff, but then control that slip as the car starts to understeer.

To the best of my knowledge this is the only way to get the DCCD to behave like it does in a WRX STi, short of a full loom swap allowing you to use the factory controller, and should be able to unlock the potential that most other controllers leave on the table.

After driving with it enabled to different thresholds for the last 6 weeks I can say with 100% certainty this is exactly what it does. I am very happy to say that the good turn-in characteristics of my car have been maintained, and whilst you can still get understeer if you do something stupid, it is both significantly reduced and easier to recover from.

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I wanted to have my DCCD install be something unique and seamlessly integrated into the car- basically I wanted to ensure my ‘normie’ mates couldn’t tell I’d actually done anything. To do this I wanted to integrate the DCCD and SI drive control panel from a GRB WRX STi into my centre console. As far as I have been able to find this hasn’t been done to a post-facelift 3.0R-B before, so definitely cool.

The shape of the GRB control panel is completely different to that of the Liberty SI drive panel, so I had to cut a new mounting hole for it. I ended up tracking down a second centre console, and had been working on this part of the project for a few weeks before the DCCD transmission swap itself. The console itself was measured up and I designed a 3D printable bracket, that was glued into the centre console to hold the GRB control panel in place and at the right height. This means the control panel clips in exactly as it would in the WRX, and should allow me to replace the panel if I have to.

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From there it was a matter of getting the SI drive functionality working. The two different SI drive panels are completely different, so I had to reverse engineer the PCB layout and determine how the switch panels operated in order to get the GRB one to talk nicely to my Liberty. Prepare for some more technical posts!
Last edited by JezzaH6 on Wed Apr 07, 2021 9:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: 2007 3.0r-b JDM DCCD Swap

Postby JezzaH6 » Wed Apr 07, 2021 9:14 pm

The stock Liberty SI drive knob communicates to the ECU by a 3 wire interface, but luckily for me it is neither CAN or Serial, but rather a simple voltage-threshold based communication scheme, with a ground, a VCC (not 12v, seems to be an arbitrary one generated somewhere else) and a signal, and a 4th wire for illumination. The signal wire was pulled to ground, but when you select an option on the switch it connects the signal wire to that VCC rail via another resistor. This creates a voltage divider and sends a voltage down the signal wire at a value depending on the option selected with the switch.

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Luckily Subaru decided to reuse this control sequence with the GRB SI drive system, so once I worked that out it was a simple process to determine the correct wires to make the system work as it was supposed to. As I had a spare SI drive controller from the Liberty centre console I harvested its connector, and soldered it to the correct spots on the GRB panel’s PCB. I also chose to remove the illumination LED from the DCCD Auto/Manual button and replace it with an RGB LED. This will be so that when I change the DCCD controller mode using that switch the button will change colour to indicate this!

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For whatever reason Subaru didn’t use a voltage-threshold communication system for the DCCD controls, instead breaking out every switch contact to the wiring loom. This made it a lot easier for me, but no idea why they’d not either send that data over CAN or at the very least save some wires and use a similar threshold communication scheme.

It was here that I ran into my first major issue. While on DCCDPro’s website they say the SpiiderPlus supports MY08+ OEM SI Drive Controls free of charge, it turns out you still have to spec that at the time of purchase. Let that be a lesson for anyone silly enough to follow this build!

As I had already started hacking the centre console to fit the GRB control panel, I needed a simple solution. So I had the switch panel, with the DCCD increase, decrease and man/auto momentary buttons, and the DCCD controller which is expecting a momentary switch input for the manual/auto mode switching, but is expecting a variable 0-5v input for adjusting the DCCD threshold level.

My fix for this is a little bit janky, but also allows for extra adjustability, as well as many different programming and input options. I made a module that sits in between the control panel, monitoring for button presses, and converting those to a servo output. This servo turns the potentiometer that came with the controller via a calculated gear ratio.

Probably not the most elegant solution, but this does have a few advantages. Firstly it allows a memory function, so when I turn the car on and off it will remember the last-used setting. It also allows for more control over the value of each individual setting. The main thing though is it should allow me in the future to integrate it into my OLED and Arduino based sensor logging system, displaying the DCCD set point and output, and logging it alongside other sensors I’ve added.

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After getting this working as it should it was time to start working on the wiring for the GRB control panel. This now has a total of 3 looms; one for the SI drive, one for the DCCD buttons and one for the LED bar graph that came with the controller. To mount this I cut a hole in the GRB panel and epoxied it in. I also adjusted the value of the LED dropper resistors to help dim these otherwise bright LED’s.

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With all of the control systems working it was time to get the controller in the car. Firstly the controller has an external gyroscope and accelerator, mounted in a small box, which needs to be mounted as close to the centre of mass of the car as possible. Since I have previously corner balanced the car I knew this point would be about 200mm in front of the ‘B’ pillars. The sensor package had a connector installed in its wiring loom to ensure I can remove the controller in the future, and the sensor itself was epoxied into position on top of the transmission tunnel.

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As I had already run a dedicated power line from the battery into the interior along side the centre diff wiring, I used a relay and switched power from the stereo to ensure the controller turns off when the car turns off. DCCDPro specifically states that their unit requires a clean source of power to avoid interference on the wheel speed sensor wiring. The centre diff supposedly can draw up to 10 amps momentarily, so this wire was fused to 15A.

The controller also requires access to the throttle position sensor, so the ecu was uncovered and the correct wire found thanks to the FSM. A handbrake connection is not essential to the DCCD functionality, but it does mean if I ever decide to do something stupid with the handbrake while driving I don’t risk damaging the centre diff. Connectors were added to all wiring to ensure I can remove the controller in the future if I ever need to- definitely something worth remembering!

At this stage the wheel speed sensor inputs on the DCCD controller were shorted together by a removable connector- this disabled the wheel slip detection functionality as I wasn’t ready to tackle that challenge yet. I also had to remove the rear air vent duct as this didn't fit over the sensor. I ended up blocking the duct that leads to the centre console as when I go on track I tend to have heater blowing on full speed to help aid in engine cooling, and I didn't want to melt anything in the console.

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With all the main wiring run the controller could be installed and the functionality tested. A test drive went really well- the system reacted to throttle, steering and braking inputs and the adjustment system worked perfectly. Testing on both asphalt and gravel roads the system felt really good and I could feel the car reacting differently under different situations.

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I had previously removed the stock GPS unit and CD drive, and I mounted the controller and my DIY adjuster-module to one of the stamped metal pieces previously used to hold the CD drive. Wiring for the adjustment switches, as well as the bar graph display and the sensor package were bundled together and ran through the dash and under the centre console. The controller was mounted in such a way that I can access the programming port without having to pull the dash apart.

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Last edited by JezzaH6 on Fri Apr 09, 2021 10:12 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: 2007 3.0r-b JDM DCCD Swap

Postby JezzaH6 » Wed Apr 07, 2021 9:14 pm

RESERVED
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